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Research Systems and Methodology Design

C4 Recovery Solutions network of experts include those who can consult on designing research systems.  For example, C4 Recovery Solutions' predecessor organization the Coalition of Outcomes Based Benefits  (COBB) consulted with  several  Federal  government officials, including then- Drug Czar General Barry McCaffrey, about using outcomes in service delivery. In response COBB convened a series of meetings to define the essential data set that would be collected by all treatment providers in order to compare the results of treatment.  Part of this process involved developing a common taxonomy in order to compare client and service characteristics.

C4 Recovery Solutions has provided assistance is designing research systems and methodology.

Office of National Drug Control Policy

C4 Recovery Solutions' predecessor organization the Coalition of Outcomes Based Benefits (COBB) consulted with several Federal government officials, including then- Drug Czar General Barry McCaffrey, about using outcomes in service delivery. In response COBB convened a series of meetings to define the essential data set that would be collected by all treatment providers in order to compare the results of treatment. Part of this process involved developing a common taxonomy in order to compare client and service characteristics.

Access and Retention Management Services

C4 Recovery Solutions collaborated with Employee Referral Foundation (ERF) a project titled Access and Retention Management Services” (ARMS) in 2003. Pretreatment Services for Wait-Listed Clients that was designed to address a problem affecting communities throughout the world, namely the lack of timely availability of treatment for substance use disorder. This project was the result of a broadly collaborative, two-year problem assessment, research, design and implementation process. A governing factor throughout was to test a cost- and outcome-effective strategy for wait-listed clients that could be readily replicated. Drawing on evidence-based practices, it was hypothesized that immediate access to interim services for those placed on wait lists would increase the number and motivation of wait-listed individuals entering treatment, the number who successfully complete treatment, and the number with long-term positive treatment outcomes. During the period September 15, 2003 – February 15, 2005 (17 months), 1,795 individuals were invited to benefit from the ARMS project, of which 1,410 voluntarily agreed to participate (79%). During this time period, of the 797 ARMS participants who reached their treatment intake date, 657 were admitted to treatment (82%). For those participating in the program, the wait time drop-out rate (18%) has been reduced by 56% from the baseline of 41%. The ARMS project demonstrated an effective strategy for improving the rate at which people on a waiting list will access an intake interview.